Khaos

Archive for February 4th, 2008

Perl Collocates: Preliminary Results

Monday, February 4th, 2008

Marty has started to analyse the blog data he retrieved from use.perl.org.

At the minute we are just looking at the collocates for “Perl”. Unsurprisingly “use perl” came out at the top but given the data source we are going to ignore that.

  • Perl 6 – 9,455 collocated occurrences
  • Perl code – 6,392 collocated occurrences
  • Perl source – 6,301 collocated occurrences
  • Wall Perl – 5,650 collocated occurrences
  • Larry Perl – 4,109 collocated occurrences
  • Perl 5 – 3,852 collocated occurrences
  • Perl unfortunately – 2,936 collocated occurrences
  • Perl Mongers – 2,769 collocated occurrences
  • Perl bug – 2,736 collocated occurrences
  • Perl Foundation – 2,732 collocated occurrences
  • Perl TODO – 2,722 collocated occurrences
  • Perl journal – 2,469 collocated occurrences
  • Perl course – 2,355 collocated occurrences
  • Perl programmers – 2,123 collocated occurrences
  • best Perl – 1,859 collocated occurrences
  • Perl6 Synopsis – 1,451 collocated occurrences
  • Perl6 doc – 1,450 collocated occurrences
  • Perl Horrors -1,332 collocated occurrences
  • Perl community – 1,005 collocated occurrences

The results for “Perl community” are being skewed because nearly 60% of the occurrences are from acme’s blog. I have no idea what “Perl Horrors” refers to and Marty is postulating that the occurrences of Perl 5 are low because that’s what people usually mean when they refer to “Perl” on its own.

There is still lots to do before I have a sensible way to display the results and also before I can graph their development over time.

Cultural Differences: Flu

Monday, February 4th, 2008

I have had the flu for the past week or so. I stayed at home, slept a lot, kept warm and drank lots of fluids. Today I contacted my Japanese teacher as I wanted to have a lesson tomorrow. I am not completely better yet but I do feel much better than I did last week.

She can’t come and teach me tomorrow. She told me that in Japan flu is considered to be an infectious disease. I agree that it’s an infectious disease but what I didn’t realise was the impact of that statement. I’m not supposed to go out and, if I were working, I would need a doctor to say it was O.K. for me to go back to work. My teacher can’t come and see me yet because she knows that there is no way my flu is completely gone. She told me that under Japanese health law she is not allowed to put her other pupils at risk of catching an infectious disease, which could happen if she saw me.

She rang tonight as she was very concerned that I had not seen a doctor. In the U.K. we are encouraged not to see a doctor for something like the flu. You can easily buy decongestants and painkillers to help alleviate the symptoms and apart from that you stay at home, rest, drink fruit juice and wait to get better. In Japan you go and see a doctor as soon as you start to feel ill and again when you think you are better. I asked my teacher what exactly the doctor could do for flu and she said that they give medicine or maybe an injection. She told me that then people recover from flu within 8 to 10 days. I told her that people in the U.K. also recover from flu within a similar time frame.

At this stage in my flu I certainly won’t get a doctor to come and see me but it seems that I am going to be expected to stay at home by myself until I am completely better – which won’t be for a few days yet.

Perl Collocates: Finding Data

Monday, February 4th, 2008

I haven’t forgotten my earlier post where I stated that I wanted to find out what collocates of “Perl” were being used by the Perl community. Stray posted a comment asking me how I planned to define “community” in this context.

“How do you define the perl *community*? Those with the loudest voices? The self-aggrandising, self-publicising, sell-appointed spokespeople?”

At this stage I don’t plan to try to define the community and I am not just looking for those with the loudest voices. But they do need to have a voice as I want to analyse what they have written.

I have decided to start with the blog posts on use.perl.org. Once I’ve done that I may take a look at the archives of some of the Perl mailing lists.